New Beginnings

  • Posted on October 14, 2013   360 Authoring Team

    When I first came to 360training.com, a little more than three years ago, the first thing I heard about was the “democratization of elearning.” The air was crisp with excitement about how we were going to take our tools, until that point used only by internal staff to create courses, and release them into the world so that anyone, anywhere, with expertise and a talent for teaching could bring that knowledge to the world.

    Today, at long last, we do just that.

    With even the simplest package—FREE Authoring Packages—you get an industry-grade course creation tool (LCMS), with the option to share the courses you build with resellers in our network, and with learners throughout your own organization through the LMS. There is no cost to get started, no barriers to entry—and everything to gain.

    PRO  takes things up a notch for elearning authors by adding on activity and game templates. Study after study has shown the importance of keeping learners engaged and active in the training. With these templates, what could take several hours to set up, program, and test, can be accomplished in minutes. Just add text and we do the rest.

    For those with a taste for entrepreneurial adventure, the ECOMMERCE package awaits—your own storefront, bringing your courses to the world under your own brand, transitioning your customers smoothly to their LMS accounts within your area, and handling all the backend ecommerce work needed to make this dream come true.

    Come, taste the adventure. Explore new worlds.

    — Laura and the 360 Authoring team.

    360training.com Authoring Program - Explore.

    Share
    Responses
    1. Samyra says:

      Having a public diugaloe around how learning technologies can and are being used is great for all of us in the learning industry. This blog post raises some key questions as to how organizations are using LCMS technology to manage course assets.To your reader’s inquiry I posit the following. It would appear that the octopus you’re attempting to tame most likely goes beyond content itself. It’s an easy time-suck to develop an ultimate pigeon whole mentality. My organization is chock full of great content and ideas. If only there was a perfect management system so we could store and retrieve it all before they retire Many of the resources you speak to (SharePoint, LCMS, LMS) are really components to the larger, overarching strategy of Knowledge Management (as per Brian Chapman) which like Content Management can mean different things to different people. As learning professionals we should recognize the development paradigm has shifted slightly to incorporate not only what might previously have been dismissed as skill of the craft, but also content once viewed as outside the required scope.Old Style New Style!Design DesignDevelop RemixDeliver ReuseEvaluate ShareRepeat ConnectYes, you still need to organize the mayhem. But trying to cram everything into a compliance-style box is counterproductive. Metatagging may even make such (SCORM) practices obsolete. The same applies to types of content. It will be necessary to embrace multiple formats and provide multiple output types. Your management tools should not dictate your content development strategy. Assembling a personalized suite of tools which communicate well with each other will support an organization’s Knowledge Management needs while addressing management of content. Content Management is really just a piece of the greater machinery so should be as flexible and agnostic as possible.

      May 29, 2014 at 4:14 pm - Reply
      • Yes, learning across the organization takes so many forms and extends to so many groups both internal and external (customers, vendors, etc.). Finding the right tools to organize, promote, and measure the effectiveness of content is key. Thank you for your comments!

        May 29, 2014 at 4:32 pm - Reply
    2. Samyra says:

      Having a public diugaloe around how learning technologies can and are being used is great for all of us in the learning industry. This blog post raises some key questions as to how organizations are using LCMS technology to manage course assets.To your reader’s inquiry I posit the following. It would appear that the octopus you’re attempting to tame most likely goes beyond content itself. It’s an easy time-suck to develop an ultimate pigeon whole mentality. My organization is chock full of great content and ideas. If only there was a perfect management system so we could store and retrieve it all before they retire Many of the resources you speak to (SharePoint, LCMS, LMS) are really components to the larger, overarching strategy of Knowledge Management (as per Brian Chapman) which like Content Management can mean different things to different people. As learning professionals we should recognize the development paradigm has shifted slightly to incorporate not only what might previously have been dismissed as skill of the craft, but also content once viewed as outside the required scope.Old Style New Style!Design DesignDevelop RemixDeliver ReuseEvaluate ShareRepeat ConnectYes, you still need to organize the mayhem. But trying to cram everything into a compliance-style box is counterproductive. Metatagging may even make such (SCORM) practices obsolete. The same applies to types of content. It will be necessary to embrace multiple formats and provide multiple output types. Your management tools should not dictate your content development strategy. Assembling a personalized suite of tools which communicate well with each other will support an organization’s Knowledge Management needs while addressing management of content. Content Management is really just a piece of the greater machinery so should be as flexible and agnostic as possible.

      May 29, 2014 at 4:14 pm - Reply
      • Yes, learning across the organization takes so many forms and extends to so many groups both internal and external (customers, vendors, etc.). Finding the right tools to organize, promote, and measure the effectiveness of content is key. Thank you for your comments!

        May 29, 2014 at 4:32 pm - Reply
    Leave a Response