OSHA Wisconsin Certification

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Until Congress created OSHA in the early 1970s, there was very little government involvement with the health and safety of workers. Now, there are numerous laws that apply in every state, including Wisconsin, that protect employees from jobsite hazards.

However, with so many different OSHA regulations in place, it can be confusing to understand what your responsibilities are, and which safety laws apply in Wisconsin. To make it a little easier for you to navigate, we’re taking a look at OSHA standards in Wisconsin, including OSHA training recommendations; how you can get your OSHA training; and why OSHA Wisconsin training is essential for workers in the state.

OSHA Wisconsin Training Requirements

Officially, Wisconsin is not a "state plan" state, which means OSHA has never given its stamp of approval to a state-level occupational health and safety program that meets or exceeds federal standards. Because of this, Wisconsinites working in the private sector fall under federal OSHA jurisdiction.

When it comes to training, OSHA mandates training on certain topics, meaning Outreach courses are not required by federal or state laws. However, OSHA does recommend that workers complete OSHA Outreach training as an orientation to the safety hazards they will encounter on the job.

Additionally, even though OSHA Outreach training isn't required by law, many Wisconsin employers will require it as part of their safety programs. The most common OSHA training courses are OSHA 10-Hour for entry-level workers and OSHA 30-Hour for supervisors.

Learn More About OSHA 10-Hour and 30-Hour Courses for Wisconsinites

We offer OSHA 10-Hour Construction, OSHA 30-Hour Construction, OSHA 10-Hour General Industry, and OSHA 30-Hour General Industry to meet your OSHA training needs.

Not sure where to start? Read our guide.

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Benefits of OSHA Wisconsin Training for Workers

When it comes to OSHA training, the main reason Wisconsin workers should complete it is to ensure they know how to prevent accidents, injuries, and fatalities at work. Additionally, when Wisconsin employers invest in OSHA training, they can reduce or evade OSHA penalties, lower workers’ compensation costs, and increase worker morale.

And if you’re not convinced that OSHA training will really help keep your workplace safe, take a look at some statistics from OSHA, the Department of Labor, and other Wisconsin government agencies. These statistics show how important OSHA training is for workplace safety.

Fatal Occupational Injuries in Wisconsin

According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were a total of 106 fatal occupational injuries in Wisconsin in 2017, while nationally there were 5,147 fatal occupational injuries.

Of the 106 fatalities:

  • 35 were the result of transportation incidents, including
    • 14 due to roadway collisions with another vehicle
    • 8 due to non-roadway incidents involving motorized vehicles
    • 5 due to jack-knifing or overturning on a roadway
    • 4 due to pedestrians being struck by vehicles in non-roadway areas
  • 20 were the result of contact with objects and equipment, including
    • 9 struck by a falling object/equipment
    • 5 struck by a powered vehicle
    • 4 struck by a flying/discharged object
  • 20 were the result of violence and other injuries by persons or animals, including
    • 11 homicides
    • 8 suicides
  • 18 were the result of falls, slips, and trips (15 of them were falls to a lower level)
  • 7 were the result of fires and explosions (5 of them were dust explosions)
  • 6 were the result of exposure to harmful substances or environments

The fatalities were distributed across the following industries:

  • 24 in agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting
  • 18 in trade, transportation, and utilities
  • 17 in construction
  • 10 in government (5 state, 5 local)
  • 9 in manufacturing
  • 5 in leisure and hospitality
  • 23 in various other private industries

2019 Top OSHA Enforcement Cases in Wisconsin

As you can see, workers in Wisconsin, especially in construction, are at risk for injury and accidents. But they are not alone. Wisconsin businesses can also use OSHA training to help reduce their risk of enforcement penalties from an OSHA inspection.

Currently, OSHA lists the top enforcement cases by state on its website, but here are the top cases for 2019.

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State Inspection Number Employer City Issuance Date Initial Penalty
WI 1363136.015 Weldall Mfg., Inc. WAUKESHA 05/09/2019 $52,511.00
WI 1363183.015 Imperial Industries, Inc. ROTHSCHILD 04/25/2019 $86,190.00
WI 1359069.015 Precision Cable Assemblies, LLC BROOKFIELD 04/12/2019 $78,706.00
WI 1371338.015 Walker Forge, Inc. CLINTONVILLE 04/11/2019 $55,791.00
WI 1374648.015 Pukall Lumber Company, Inc. ARBOR VITAE 07/17/2019 $348,467.00
WI 1384208.015 Maynard Steel Casting Company MILWAUKEE 07/11/2019 $48,758.00
WI 1401653.015 Wood Sewer & Excavation, Inc. FOX POINT 09/11/2019 $65,921.00
WI 1364521.015 Crothall Laundry Services, Inc. OAK CREEK 03/12/2019 $41,676.00
WI 1361317.015 Martin's Bulk Milk Service, Inc. WILTON 01/29/2019 $49,440.00

Federal OSHA Offices in Wisconsin

Since Wisconsin employers and workers fall under federal OSHA jurisdiction, there are four local area offices in major cities throughout the state of Wisconsin:

  • Appleton
  • Eau Claire
  • Madison
  • Milwaukee

If for any reason, you need to contact a local Wisconsin OSHA office, you can find their contact information on OSHA’s website.

Additional Wisconsin Resources for Safety Information

In addition to the information we have provided, you can visit additional Wisconsin state agency websites for more safety resources.

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development (DWD): The DWD manages and oversees a wide variety of programs, which includes providing assistance to jobseekers looking for work and employers looking to hire, protecting and enforcing workers’ rights, and administering workers’ compensation claims.

Wisconsin Occupational Health Laboratory (WOHL): As part of the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, the WOHL provides laboratory services for industrial hygiene chemical analysis; offers on-site consultation services to assist Wisconsin employers in meeting their OSHA responsibilities; and conducts annual surveys with the Bureau of Labor Statistics on occupational injuries and illnesses.

Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services (DSPS): The DSPS works with businesses and trade professionals, in addition to administering and enforcing laws to ensure safe and sanitary conditions in public and private buildings.

Enroll Now in Wisconsin OSHA Training Courses

Now that you have a clear understanding of the benefits OSHA Wisconsin training has to the safety and well-being of workers, supervisors, and employers in Wisconsin, your next step is to select the right OSHA training course for you.

We have over 20 years of experience as an OSHA-authorized training provider, and we offer OSHA 10-Hour Construction, OSHA 30-Hour Construction, OSHA 10-Hour General Industry, and OSHA 30-Hour General Industry to satisfy your OSHA training needs.

The best part is that you can register for training today and complete your course online and at your own pace.

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