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5 Ways a BBS Program can Change Your Business

Matt Luman September 12, 2016 0

Behavior Based Safety Program

Behavior Based Safety (BBS) is an approach to increase workplace safety through learned behaviors and implementation of the best safety practices. According to the Behavior Based Safety Guide put out by Health and Safety Authority, this type of approach utilizes frontline employees with the support of the company’s safety leaders. Setting goals, providing reinforcement, and offering feedback are effective ways of changing targeted behaviors. Implementing a BBS program can change and improve your business in several important ways:

  1. Decrease Accidents

The first benefit of implementing a Behavior Based Safety program will be a decrease in the number of work-related accidents. This can create major changes in occupations where there tends to be a higher rate of accidents and injuries. Industries such as construction, manufacturing, transportation, and healthcare could see a substantial decrease in accidents after implementing a Behavior Based Safety program.

  1. Cut Workers’ Compensation Expenses

A decrease in accidents and injuries will help reduce workers’ compensation costs. Since workers’ compensation is state-mandated and employers can’t choose to cut certain benefits as they can with company healthcare, one of the ways to cut costs is to reduce the overall number of accidents. Putting together a safety program that is specific to the needs of your business can reduce work-related injuries and illnesses, and ultimately cut workers’ compensation expenses.

  1. Increase Productivity

With fewer accidents and less downtime, productivity will likely rise. According to the Institute for Safety and Health Management, occupational safety will increase an employee’s commitment to the company. If employees feel safer on the job, they will be more likely to work more efficiently without having fear of being injured. This can have a major impact on productivity when an employee is working with large or potentially dangerous machinery.

  1. Boost Morale

A safer work environment will almost certainly raise worker morale. Knowing that the company cares enough to implement a quality training program will improve the attitude and outlook of your employees. Since positive reinforcement and immediate feedback are major aspects of a Behavior Based Safety program, this creates a more positive work environment for every employee. When a BBS program is implemented at your business, employees can be confident that they are part of a team that is developing habits to keep them safer.

  1. Improve the Bottom Line

A company’s profits will increase with higher productivity, less workers’ compensation costs, and increased employee morale. The expense involved in hiring new employees or retraining existing personnel to fill in for workers who have been injured can dramatically affect a company’s finances. Implementing a successful Behavior Based Safety program can ultimately lead to increased revenue and profits.

Implementing the Best Training

When developing a BBS program, it’s crucial for employees to receive the best training possible. 360training.com offers a comprehensive Behavioral Based Safety Certification Program. The course objectives include how to properly conduct safety observations, the best way to approach improper behavior, and how to guide employees through safe work practices. After completing the course, you will be able to customize an effective BBS Program that works specifically for your workforce. Contact 360training.com for more information about Behavior Based Safety training programs.

 

Sources:

http://www.hsa.ie/eng/Publications_and_Forms/Publications/Safety_and_Health_Management/behaviour_based_safety_guide.pdf

https://ishm.org/safety-health-good-business-benefits/

http://www.360training.com/environmental-health-safety/behavioral-safety-/behavioral-safety/behavioral-based-safety-certification-program

 

 

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